African Living

African Living

I love my heritage.  The longer I live, the more I’m loving it.  It’s never-ending.  So rich, so deep.  Just overflowing with lushness, variety, scope  and ever so much history.  How could I not love it?

Ra Semahj Understanding The Ankh & The Science Of Kemet:Ma’at – YouTube

Posted by on 7 Jun, 2015 in Habari | Comments Off on Ra Semahj Understanding The Ankh & The Science Of Kemet:Ma’at – YouTube

Ra Semahj Understanding The Ankh & The Science Of Kemet:Ma’at – YouTube

https://youtu.be/kPj_hXH8hmg Knowledge is KEY!  Check this wisdom out.  You won’t regret it.  Like Muta Baruka says, “Anytime him talk, you gwarn understand what we ah talk bout!”

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21 varieties of traditional African homosexuality | 76 CRIMES

Posted by on 7 Jun, 2015 in Habari | Comments Off on 21 varieties of traditional African homosexuality | 76 CRIMES

21 varieties of traditional African homosexuality | 76 CRIMES

Source: 21 varieties of traditional African homosexuality | 76 CRIMES Articles like the one above really get my goat!  Before anyone jumps down my throat let me make it clear from now.  I am in no way shape or form anti-anybody whose sexual orientation differs from mine – at all.  What I am annoyed about is not the concept that homosexuality was also in pre-colonial Africa.  That doesn’t bother me in the slightest.  It is the constant, almost insistent, manner that people feel they need to go through to make it seem that these practices were the NORM for pre-colonial Africa. As others have already stated, it seems to be a wish of a certain type of people that Africa be a homosexual society before their interference into the continent, maybe as a justification – in their minds – for their own sexual preferences.  We see it all the time.  It’s called “deflection”.  In this case, tptb (the powers that be) know that for them to stand a chance, they have to reduce the population in large numbers.  One way is through lowering childbirth rates en masse.  So along with contraception, they reward greedy individuals to perpetuate the “positives of alternative lifestyles” in any way possible.  This, to me, is one such article. I repeat.  I, in no way whatsoever, have no animosity to anyone of an opposing sexuality to me, unless they are a paedophile or bestiality participant – children and animals cannot give consent.  I don’t care what anyone wants to say on that.  My point is, as I inferred earlier, I’m annoyed.  Annoyed at the constant barrage on Africa to conform to European and other outside cultures’ viewpoint on how the world should be.  Africans are NOT Europeans.  Nor are they Asians or Americans or any other continent that is not Africa.  They’re AFRICANS.  They do things THEIR way.  Just like everybody else.  And just like everybody else, they should be allowed to record and present their story for themselves without having to keep certain minorities and their guilt complexes in favour by appeasing them with foolishness and falsehoods about general acceptance of their sexual choices and...

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South of the Border – Revisited.

Posted by on 12 May, 2015 in Habari | 0 comments

South of the Border – Revisited.

Last Friday, the 17th April, 2015, the hubby and I found ourselves back in South London, at the wonderful ADE Photographers and Printers there in thee Indoor Market in Rye Lane, Peckham.

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African Love

Posted by on 20 Mar, 2015 in Habari | 1 comment

African Love

“To know yourself is to love yourself.”  “If you don’t love yourself, then how can you truly love others?”  Statements like this offend a lot of people.  I can’t understand why as they make perfect sense to me.  If you don’t know and understand yourself, can you expect anyone else to know and understand you?  How can you know and understand or even empathise with another?  If you’ve never experienced joy, how could you understand when another expresses their joy?  To me, these things are a necessity when it comes to my culture and how I relate to humanity as a whole. That’s part of the reason why, along with thousands of others, I went on the march from Brixton to Downing Street last year.  It was like a calling from ages past that could not be ignored or denied.  I knew it was the ancestors in me calling out.  So I followed their instructions and partook in that historical event.  It was all about knowing who I am, and where I’ve been and allowing myself to be guided into my future with surety – particularly as an African in the diaspora. Too often around the net and elsewhere, I see comments (usually from non-Africans) lambasting black folk who wish to practice African pride openly.  Why does it concern these people so much when someone like myself starts realising their heritage and start to speak up on it?  In all my years of living in London, I’ve been bombarded – from cradle to present day- with the British person’s love of all things British, until recent years, without complaint.  At no point have I witnessed the British media and Britain’s other institutions apologising for or stopping their nationalism.  So why do even some black acquaintances feel that me and others should “hold down” our African pride?  Seriously, what’s that all about? Being proud of my heritage does not mean that I’m against anybody else’s.  That’s foolishness to hate someone because they’re “different”.  I’m of the mindset of “You do you, and I’ll do me”, aka LIVE AND LET LIVE.  As I’ve said before, as an African, my heritage is RICH.  It started civilisation and brought so much benefit to the planet and the peoples wherever it went.  When I know that even here in London, my ancestors influences can be seen all around the boroughs, I feel a painful pride.  Not everything here came AFTER the kidnapping (slavery).  I suggest that any Londoners reading this post check  out their local borough’s coat of arms.  They may get a surprise with all the lions, leopards, ostrich feathers and other African-originated items they will see.  These things I will shout to the rooftops as often as possible – without...

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Mission U.S. – The Flight to Freedom

Posted by on 8 Oct, 2014 in Habari | 0 comments

Mission U.S. – The Flight to Freedom

I came across a link on my Facebook timeline the other day that enraged me.  It was a trailer for a game called: The Slavery Game.  Thankfully, it was a hoax, but it made me do some thinking.  “Was this a singular entity?” “What was its purpose?” “Who was this made for and why?” I did a search and saw an interesting caption: “They Made a Video Game About Slavery, And It’s Actually Good“.  It was an article by a gentleman named Kirk Hamilton.  His article spoke of a video game that was educational and produced by New York Public Media’s WNET Thirteen.  The game is called: Mission U.S. – Flight to Freedom.  There’s actualy three games in the series. The first, dealing with the American Civil War, the second deals with slavery in the 19th century, and the third deals with the Cheyenne people in early America.  They’re all free games that can be played in your browser.  Flight to Freedom is the second in the series.  I downloaded all three and have installed Flight to Freedom. I must say, the prologue was very tasteful. I’ll begin the game properly, in the next few days (gotta make some trousers for the hubby first, lol) and hopefully, I’ll have more info to share.  In the meantime, here’s a link to try the games for yourselves, then you can tell me what your verdict of the game is.  Is it racist or educational?  You decide. http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mu10.vk8soc.7-8.newnation.flifree/mission-us-flight-to-freedom/...

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South of The Border

Posted by on 8 Oct, 2014 in Habari, Home | 0 comments

South of The Border

The other day myself and the hubby took up an opportunity to get some pictures taken of my products by a wonderful friend in the community. I have to give props to the wonderful and delighful Dulaani of A.D.E. Photographers and Printers based in Peckham Rye, south London. The staff were welcoming and warm. The offices were cosy. It’s amazing what can be done with units these days. I was surprised by the amount of space they had and how well lit it was too. (Duh! It’s a photographer’s studio, Shady lol). We met two lovely young girls there who showed wonderfully high levels of intellect and good behaviour. A breath of fresh air these days, I can tell you. I introduced the elder girl to the game Mission US 2. She loved it! To tell the truth, she put me to shame as I hadn’t even got past the prologue at the time. She had completed the prologue and was at part 4 by the time the studio had closed for the evening. She told me she was going to complete the game when she got home. She enjoyed it that much! Well, you know I couldn’t let a ten-year-old defeat me. I completed the game last night lol. It was an enjoyable experience at the studio. Dressing and redressing the mannequin was frustrating at times, what with things not hanging right when I needed them to, or getting caught on jagged corners and such, but all said and done, it was fun. Dulaani was a wonderful host and he put me and the hubby at ease from the off. He even got my hubby to look like he was enjoying modelling (no mean feat, I can tell you! Lol. I’m currently awaiting the fruits of our joint labour so that I can share them with you all in the shop and the gallery. I hope that you’ll have as much pleasure looking at and wearing my designs as I have making and wearing...

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Blackout Monday

Posted by on 8 Sep, 2014 in Habari | 0 comments

Blackout Monday

In retaliation to the latest murder of a young black male called Michael “Mike” Brown at the hands of a white police officer, an international call was sent out to the Afrekan community. On the 8th September, the Afrekan diaspora and motherland were expected to ONLY spend their finance with other black/Afrekan businesses. The aim? To hit white supremacy in its pocket – hard. Now I’ll be real with you. I have absolutely NO CLUE how successful that was at time of posting, but I hope this kind of initiative is repeated. When I think on the money that was earned off the backs of my ancestors’ kidnapped enslavement, and how much finance is given by modern afrekans, willingly, to keep white supremacy in luxury, my blood starts to boil. There have been many statistics bandied around by various economic polls claiming that in the hair industry alone, afrekan people contribute $8 BILLION a year. Eight fucking billion! We won’t even mention the trainer/sneaker market, or the “designer label” section. Yet afrekan people continually claim they are broke. Eight billion dollars, yearly, as a people, would be a major contribution to the rebuilding of Mother Afreka and many of our communities in the diaspora. As a people, we invest the least in our future. As a people, we invest the least in our children, financially. As a people, particularly in the diaspora, we own the least land. We have the least properties, the least businesses, the least hospitals, the least schools, the least banks, the least social services, the lowest wages/salaries, the least respect globally. Yet we can find a collective minimum of EIGHT BILLION DOLLARS yearly, to help others possess land, own businesses, own schools, own healthcare centres, own banks, gain higher education, own properties and everything else that comes from so-called great wealth. We are the only group of people who do this foolishness. No other cultural group practices this behaviour as they know, to uplift another before yourself is to commit suicide. No other group of people have been kidnapped, enslaved, colonized, jim crow’d, oppressed, and depressed in the same way as the Afrekan people (I include my brothers and sisters in Australasia, Polynesia, Asia and the Americas). No one. We are STILL under neo-colonial oppression, both at home and abroad. With continual harrassment, belittlement and physical abuse from state authorities wherever we inhabit, mixed with a slow awakening to the blatant racist genecide being perpetrated against Afrekan people, it was only a matter of time before something kicked off. In the midst of the recent Ferguson riots, a call was put out and was echo’d by some members of the Afrekan community. When I first saw it mentioned on my Facebook page, I was all “About fucking time!”. But then I thought about it. I smoke cigarettes. A particular brand which is only sold in select shops near me. Where the heck will I get my fags from? There’s no black newsagents or grocers near me. I also enjoy vegetarian cuisine. None of the afrekan restaurants near me cook or provide delicious imaginative vegetarian meals. One store directly told me to my face that it wasn’t viable for them to provide vegetarian food. Most of the few afrekan-owned businesses in my area are typical afrekan...

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Reparation March 1st August 2014

Posted by on 8 Aug, 2014 in Habari | 0 comments

Reparation March 1st August 2014

Rise up to Rastafari Movement UK, the wonderful Esther Stanford and the other organisations who put out the call to diasporic afrekans to sign a petition and march on Downing Street. No-one could have expected the support they received. Great work, ladies and gentlemen. We look forward to more of the same in the near future. “Reparation is a must!” http://youtu.be/P0rDtru6CVAVideo can’t be loaded: Black Friday: 1st August March for reparations (Brixton to Downing Street) (http://youtu.be/P0rDtru6CVA) “The day we remembered our ancestral duty”  1st August 2014 Reparation March to Downing Street Black Friday some called it. All that I know is that it was one of, if not THE best day of my life to date. Friday 1st August, 2014 the day thousands of kidnapped Afrekan descendants descended on Downing Street with a petition demanding that parliament recognise that the discussion of Reparation needs to be put on their agenda It was a truly magnificent day. We did our ancestors proud!...

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